oskebuckley's blog

Yale Law School Dean Argues Against Corporate Participation in Political Campaigns

William Locke 

Harvard Crimson 

Friday, May 3

Republicans Join Democrats as Maine Legislature Votes to Overturn Citizens United and Get Big Money Out of Politics

AUGUSTA, ME – Noting that “the current legal landscape severely constrains the range of options available to citizens, frustrating efforts to reduce the influence of moneyed interest in elections and in government," a resolution to overturn the Supreme Court’s Citizens United decision was passed today by both the Maine State House and State Senate.

Pennsylvania Court Deals Blow to Secrecy-Obsessed Fracking Industry: Corporations Not The Same As Persons With Privacy Rights

Photo credit: Brandi Merolla

New Hampshire State House to Congress: Overturn Citizens United And Get Big Money Out of Politics

 

CONCORD, NH. –On Wednesday, by a bipartisan vote of 189-139, the New Hampshire House of Representatives passed a resolution calling on Congress to overturn the Supreme Court’s ruling in Citizens United by amending the U.S. Constitution to make clear that corporations are not people with constitutional rights (HCR 2).

Overturning Citizens United: Is a Constitutional Amendment the Best Path to Limit Dark Money?

 

John Bonifaz, executive director and co-founder of Free Speech For People, joined Democracy Now for a debate with Mark Schmitt, a senior fellow at the Roosevelt Institute, to discuss whether the push for a constitutional amendment is the best path to overturning Citizens United

 

The New York Times: The White House Joins the Cash Grab

The New York Times

Editorial

March 2, 2013 

It is tempting to applaud the nonprofit group now spending nearly $100,000 on ads to pressure Republican lawmakers to accept gun-control measures. The group is fighting a well-financed and powerful corporate gun lobby that has never hesitated to spend millions to get its way in Congress.

From The Nation: The Election Reform Moment?

The Nation 

John Nichols

This article appeared in the February 18, 2013 edition of The Nation.

Excerpt: 

Supreme Court lets ban stand on direct corporate campaign donations

The Washington Post 

Robert Barnes 

February 25, 2013 

The Supreme Court on Monday decided against reviewing the century-old ban on corporations making direct contributions to federal candidates.

The court without comment declined to hear an appeal from two men who said the court’s 2010 decision in Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission, which allowed corporations and unions to spend unlimited amounts on elections, must also nullify the ban on campaign contributions.